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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  March 1, 2017 9:30pm-10:00pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. francois fillon is one of the main contenders in the frencch presidential election. today he said he'll be placed under investigation by a frenchjudge — but that he won't stand down. translation: i will not give up, i will not withdraw, take you to the end. it is democracy being challenged. a special extended report from the white house press briefing room. the famous donald trump press conference, where he took questions for over one hour. every president has disliked the press coverage . every president has disliked the press coverage. none before this has declared war in the first week. we have a special report on the parcel that was delivered to bradley wiggins in 2011. a un investigation into the battle
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for aleppo has found that war crimes were committed — by both sides. government forces are accused of targeting hospitals and using chlorine bombs. on the rebels, it concluded quote "armed groups shot at civilians to prevent them from leaving, effectively using them as human shields." quad you may also remember this. you may also remember this. an aid convoy was bombed on the outskirts of aleppo last year. investigators found the government meticulously planned and ruthlessly carried out the attack. they also concluded the eventual evacuation
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of eastern aleppo amounted to forced displacement. one more thing we must emphasise — the investigators found no evidence russia carried out any war crimes despite its support for the government. alex forsyth has more from beirut. this report is highly critical of the contact of those involved in the battle for aleppo. war crimes committed by all parties. it singles out one incident which the un report saysis out one incident which the un report says is particularly shocking. the attack on humanitarian aid convoy last september. trucks carrying much—needed aid supplies into aleppo had the permission of the syrian government, and they knew where they we re government, and they knew where they were travelling when they came under attack on the road, as they were making their way into aleppo. they we re making their way into aleppo. they were dropping aid, they were under machine—gun fire from aircraft. a number of the trucks were destroyed,
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14 number of the trucks were destroyed, 1a people killed. as a result humanitarian aid into aleppo was suspended, exacerbating conditions for the civilians trapped in the besieged areas of the city. after that, widespread condemnation of the attack, by the international community. questions as to who had been involved. russia and syria denied any involvement. they said that the attack was carried out by the syrian air force. cycling. it's emerged today that the doctor at the centre of a mystery package delivered to sir bradley wiggins in 2011, has no record of what wiggins was being given. the records were on the laptop of former team sky doctor richard freeman but it was stolen in 2014. that's according to evidence given to a parliamentary inquiry by uk anti doping's chief executive nicole sa pstead. here's some of her statement.
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there are no records, particularly those kept by doctor freeman. who was the doctor, overseeing team sky at this particular event. absolutely no records whatsoever. the man to deliver the package, the former coach simon cope, taking it from manchester or the way to france. he says it never occurred to him to ask what he was delivering. here years. i have listened to the evidence to date, i think you have been left to dangle. by the people he may be former colleagues and friends, you have been left in a difficult
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position. do you feel that? yes. anything else you want to tell the committee? bearing in mind you have been done in? i don't know anything, i told you all i know. i don't know what is in it, i was asked to take it by my employers. ollie foster is in the bbc sports centre. it appears to bea in the bbc sports centre. it appears to be a damaging afternoon for a number of the parties. the reputation for british cycling is at an all—time low. doctor richard freeman was supposed to be there to date in a fascinating couple of hours at westminster. he is unwell, still employed by british cycling, the doctor who received the package, was adjusted decongestant as sir dave bra ilsford was adjusted decongestant as sir dave brailsford said, six years ago. as some suspect, one of those steroids that sir bradley wiggins had therapeutic use exemption is for, but not on the final racy won.
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british cycling responding to the frustrated comments in parliament. they say... british cycling saying they needed to get their house in order, and they have. at the heart of it is getting the evidence from doctor richard freeman, he said he was not well enough to appear in front of the select committee to find out what exactly was in that parcel. finally team sky has come out of a statement saying they have done no wrong. nick colsaerts
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—— nicole sa pstead —— nicole sapstead said they do have a policy, but no body was doing to it. still to come — i've got a special report from inside the white house press corp — filmed in one of the most tumultuous weeks of mr trump's presidency. children as young as four will learn about healthy relationships under new plans for all schools in england. pupils in secondary schools will be taught about the dangers of sexting and online pornography as part of the sex education. elaine dunkley reports. how young is too young to learn about relationships and sex? fees six and seven—year—olds at goose green primary are learning about their bodies, soon compulsory for all school children to have lessons like this. today the government has announced that age—appropriate classes will be taught to children as young as four. if we only have
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sex education at secondary school, children already going through puberty, they are thinking about having boyfriends and girlfriends, which is happening. they recognise what to do, who did turn to, how they feel about things. the strongest argument for change and up to date teaching is that times have changed, children more exposed to sexual images than ever before through internet and mobile phones. the guidance schools are looking to, in terms of how they teach relationships and sex education was developed in the year 2000. prisoners are very place. important that we have an updated approach, meaning children are safe and protected. charities, teaching unions and mps have been campaigning for the government to introduce compulsory sex education. whilst there has been support from faith groups, there has been criticism. we need to look at families, support and encourage them to engage with children about these issues. to check how they're using their mobile
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phones, to check where they are online up in their bedrooms. that is what parents can do. controlling what parents can do. controlling what children see and hear in a digital world mean parents have to be one step ahead of the technology. my be one step ahead of the technology. my daughter is five, she copies anything she sees, the dance moves, everything she sees. you are too young, i need you to enjoy your childhood. quite nice to know kids are being taught about sex and relationships. at school by qualified teachers. in scotland, wales and northern ireland sex education is not compulsory. all uk governments face the challenge of how best to prepare young people for life in modern britain. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is...
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france's centre right presidential candidate francois fillon has said a judge will place him under investigation over a fake job scandal — but he won't stand down. i'm going to do something we don't often do on outside source — and play you a 15 minute report. because this is worth seeing in full. film—maker olly lambert spent a week behind the scenes in the white house documenting the tumultuous week when national security adviser michael flynn resigned and president trump held his first press c0 nfe re nce since taking office. this is the film made for the bbc‘s newsnight. every president in american history has disliked press coverage he got. what is unusual is none before this has declared war in the first week. he needs an enemy. i call the fake
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i'iews he needs an enemy. i call the fake news the enemy of the people, and they are. he presented us the timeline. we always have an adverse or your relationship, in some cases thatis or your relationship, in some cases that is healthy and natural. this is beyond adversarial. we are supposed to have a thick skin can dispassionate observers. we are not bringing ourselves to the table as pa rt bringing ourselves to the table as part of the story, we are being brought into the story, a very uncomfortable place to be. we have to cut through the clutter, try to focus on the things that actually matter. now things are happening. president trump's embattled national security adviser general michael flynn stepping down monday night in a firestorm of criticism, after misleading vice president mike pence over conversations with the russian ambassador to the united states. over conversations with the russian ambassador to the united statesm is day 25 of the trump presidency. the white house has been hit with
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its biggest scandal to date. the president's national security adviser, michael flynn, has had to resign had missed reports he had had secret contact with russia before trump took office. these have been very tumultuous weeks to renew president. to have a national security adviser and forced out so early on it is rather unprecedented to see something happen that quickly. right now this briefing i’ooiti quickly. right now this briefing room is a place you have tb. —— have two feet. michael flynn's shock resignation draws a big crowd to sean spicer‘s daily press briefing. the challenge for the white house is to make sure it stays ahead of us. that is why some of these briefings can be as contentious as they are.
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good afternoon, happy valentine's day. fine for some love in the room. the big question is what the president know, and when did he know it? when did the president find out that michael flynn did not tell the truth. we have been reviewing and evaluating the issue in respect to gemma flynn on a daily basis for a few weeks. the president was very concerned that gemma flynn misled the vice president and others. concerned that gemma flynn misled the vice president and othersm concerned that gemma flynn misled the vice president and others. if he was not about 17 days ago he had misled the vice president and other officials, and he was a potential threat to blackmail by the russians, why would he be kept on for almost three weeks? that assumes a lot of things that were not true. this was an act of trust. red —— if he did mislead the vice president from a pure and simple it was a matter of
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trust. thank you, i will see you tomorrow. happy valentine's day. very haphazard. the briefing happens, so many other questions to develop in the hours coming up. two hours after the briefing, a selected group of journalists is hours after the briefing, a selected group ofjournalists is invited to a gaggle. group ofjournalists is invited to a gaggle, an off—camera meeting with sean spicer in his office. have you got something? there has been an exodus out of sean spicer‘s office. hello. they gaggle has revealed another twist. trump had known for over two weeks that flynn discussed sanctions with the russians, but trump did not inform his vice president, mike pence. he had found out by reading the washington post.
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why was mike pence kept in the dark? you cannot have your national security adviser running around misleading senior administration officials, especially the vice president. the spider press team's best efforts, the russia story is not going away. —— despite the press team's ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, and the prime minister of israel. benjamin netanyahu the prime minister of israel. benjamin neta nyahu arrived the prime minister of israel. benjamin netanyahu arrived in washington. after flynn's resignation, the press corps is hungry to question trump on his relationship with russia. the protocol of a joint press conference, fourjournalists are allowed to ask questions. it is the leaders who decide which journalists to call on. we will take a couple of questions. david brodie. christian broadcasting. katie, town hall. for
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the second time this week, trump ignores the major networks. instead, he selects questions from two small conservative news outlets. neither asked directly about his links with russia. are you going to answer questions about your contacts with the russians? can you guarantee that nobody in your campaign had any contact with the russians? any questions on russia? the idea that four reporters, two domestic and two foreign in two events, eight question no questions about the biggest news of the week, it is insane. we have a huge story going on on the russians. blockbuster front—page story in the new york times, alleging contacts between the
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trump campaign and the russian government, the russian intelligence. the issue does not come up in a press conference, because he is calling on friendly news outlets. amazing. you have to work hard to call on two reporters who would not ask that question. that takes some doing. you fired him, why did you fire him? while the major networks feel ignored, this is an opportunity for 23—year—old white house correspondent for the newly formed conservative outlet one american news. i asked the question what the president thought about the story coming out in the new york times. i asked the president about the phone call. such a unique opportunity for a young journalist to have. i would not traded for the world. something i'm extremely excited about. it gives other
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outlets and viewers and an opportunity to feel like they are connected to this white house as well. bringing new people and is great, helpful, these people represent audiences that have real readers and listeners, and viewers. what we don't want is for eddie administration to hand—pick, get the questioners they think our best to put out their message, instead of defending their policies every day. i don't think people realise how small this places, the white house. this is essentially our home, our home for a very long time. this used to be franklin roosevelt's simple. not very comfortable. there are mice in this building. my cellphone does not work at my desk. you are there
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four am, you are not sleeping for a week. it is a vibrant, diarmuid —— dynamic place to be right now. a pin press. we are lining up. we will get a phone call soon. press conference, 12:30 p. m.. will get a phone call soon. press conference, 12:30 p.m.. the russia crisis is threatening to engulf the white house. at the last minute, sean spicer‘s daily briefing is cancelled, trump announces his first solo press conference as president of the united states. he's having a press c0 nfe re nce , of the united states. he's having a press conference, come to the white house. when i saw the news there was going to be a press conference in one hour i raced over. going to be a press conference in one houri raced over. another example that never a dull moment. so chaotic, never seen such short notice for a press conference.”
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chaotic, never seen such short notice for a press conference. i had the sense it was going to be a pretty contentious affair. ladies and gentlemen, president of the united states. god bless america, let's take some questions. yes. i wa nt to let's take some questions. yes. i want to get you to clarify, an important point. can you say definitively nobody on your campaign had any contact with the russians? when trump has a story he does not lie, he's very good are diverging. russia is fake news. put out by the media. false, horrible fate reporting. makes it that much harder to make a deal with russia. reporting. makes it that much harder to make a dealwith russia. one hour, 70 minutes with the president of the united states insulting reporters to our faces. the audiences being told not to trust us. never seen a audiences being told not to trust us. never seen a more audiences being told not to trust us. never seen a more dishonest media than the political media. take a look at some of your shows, the tone is such a trip. the public does
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not believe you people anymore. maybe i have something to do with that, i don't know. story after story after story is bad. i won. i won. zero chaos. this is a fine tuned machine. the press should be ashamed of their sermons. he is resetting his presidency, or trying after four tough weeks with leeks and problems, firing. he was trying to reset. he goes out in their press conference, suddenly back to the trump, he was like a mad me, i will shut you down if i don't like you, i will insult you, tell you to sit down. sit down, i understand the rest of your question. quiet. quiet. sit down. i don't have to do that. i don't have to tell you what i'm going to do in north korea. i then have to tell you what i'm going to do with north korea. eventually you will get tired of asking the question. he has never been in a
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place, where it a lie, will get reported. as a lie. this is a different kind of press corps. guess who was the biggest electoral couege who was the biggest electoral college win since ronald reagan ? in fact present obama got 355.|j in fact present obama got 355. i was talking about republican. george hw bush, 426 when he won as president. why should americans trust you? when you accuse information they receive as being fake, when you provide information. i was given that information. i was given that information. i was given that information. i have seen that around. very substantial victory, do you agree with that? you are the president. you can push back, say no, we're not fake news can we are real news. at some point the president of the united states has
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two deal with reality. with real news. the only thing worse than fake news. the only thing worse than fake news is the denial of real news. aren't you concerned you are undermining the people's faith in the first amendment, freedom of the press? when you call stories you don't like fake news. why not save it as don't like fake news. why not save itasa don't like fake news. why not save it as a story i don't like. we just keep doing ourjob. nobody got into becoming a reporter to be loved. if he wants to go after us, that is his decision. i am he wants to go after us, that is his decision. iam not he wants to go after us, that is his decision. i am not sure it is the smart, long—term decision for building support in the country. four years to go. i mean, you don't like to be locked in with a group called a bunch of lies, especially when the person doing it is the president of the united states of america. by the way, when yourjob is to cover him. hard to explain. after a while can just
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is to cover him. hard to explain. after a while canjust doesn't bother you anymore. you just go read your story. asking questions. -- go after your story. it is stressful, draining. ifeel such pride that after your story. it is stressful, draining. i feel such pride that we, in the face of all this comment did our very best to present the most honest account of what happened here in this building to our audience each day. if they do not hear it from us, i am each day. if they do not hear it from us, iam not sure each day. if they do not hear it from us, i am not sure whether they will know the truth. fascinating insight into the relationship between donald trump and the media. worth seeing all 15 minutes of that report. thank you for watching, i will be back tomorrow at the same time. at the end of the day, the
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atmosphere is alljoined up. watching early on in the week, i was indicating how developments in north america could develop our weather at the end of the week. it looks like panning out that way. the weather has been erupting into life in parts of the us. violent storms in the midwest, tornadoes as well. early start to the severe weather season. what do i mean? scenes like this, huge tornadoes rampaging across the states. into the northwest. these sorts of effects that tornadoes like this had. putting our weather into perspective. there are very destructive storms across parts of illinois. those storms are injecting a lot of energy into the upper atmosphere is well. having the effect of shunting the jet stream northwards. there is a downstream dip into thejet northwards. there is a downstream dip into the jet stream. scooping northwards. there is a downstream dip into thejet stream. scooping up an area pressure, producing a very wet end of the week. what goes on in
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the states can influence what is going on back here. nothing as extremist. in rough weather on the way. some snow over high grounds in parts of england and wales. things subsiding into the day. quite a blustery day, the worst of the rain and snow will clear away in central areas. many of us will settle into a reasonable day, some sunshine, just a few showers left behind in western scotland. quite wintry. temperatures higher than they were on wednesday. across some areas into double figures. trouble is, does last. as the jet stream scoops up low pressure i pointed out, here comes the rain, to end the week across england and wales. this appointing friday, heavy rain. for northern ireland, holding on to dry in bright weather for the longest. probably not lasting that much longer before the rain eventually arrives. pretty chilly in most places, rain across the south. it is set to sit across
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the south. it is set to sit across the top of the uk. for much of the weekend we can expect wet weather at times. if that was enough, that will bejoined by times. if that was enough, that will be joined by low—pressure coming times. if that was enough, that will bejoined by low—pressure coming in off the atlantic to join in the fun and produce more rain. if you have plans for the weekend, expect some wet weather at times. not all the time, buta wet weather at times. not all the time, but a blustery wind will make you feel quite chilly in places as well. the low—pressure in control, do not take these blobs of blue to literally, the detail may change. in some places persist in wet weather, a cold easterly wind. temperatures higher the further south you go. by sunday, some respite before the next area of low—pressure jointing. perhaps pushing brain into south—western areas later on in the day. elsewhere, some drier spells, blustery wind, feeling quite chilly. that is the setup through the weekend. low—pressure positioned in the depth of the jet stream. mainly
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to the south of us, on the northern side of remaining chilly through next week. there are indications through some computer models the jet strea m through some computer models the jet stream may shoot northwards, ushering in warmer south—westerly winds, giving us something a bit more springlike later on next week. a long way off, but perhaps something to look forward to. tonight at ten: the government suffers its first major defeat on brexit. the house of lords has voted by a big majority to give eu nationals already living here the right to stay in the uk. this is about as speaking to what people need to put their fears and anguish at bay. why is everybody here today so excited about an amendment that looks after the foreigners and not the british? the issue now goes back to the commons, where the government will attempt
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to overturn the decision. we'll be asking whether it could delay brexit? also tonight: what does the deltoids do? two british doctors who travelled to syria to join so—called islamic state have been killed in the iraqi city of mosul.
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